Sussex X: The City of Brighton and Hove

VCH Volume: 
Sussex X: The City of Brighton and Hove

Volume X of the VCH Sussex will cover all of the ancient parishes wholly or partly within the boundary of the City of Brighton and Hove – Aldrington, Brighton, Falmer, Hangleton, Hove, Ovingdean, Patcham, Portslade, Preston, Rottingdean, Stanmer and West Blatchington.

The volume will not be arranged by parish for it does not work well for an urban area but will broadly follow the concept used for the two volumes about Chester but with adaptions which better accommodate the larger area and the very different economic history. Brighton’s development, first as a fishing town specialising in long distance fishing, and then its regeneration as a resort exerted very different influences on the hinterland which the other parishes became.

The 190,000 word volume will be divided into two sections.  The first section is organised chronologically and will concentrate key themes which shaped the landscape of the area now within the City from prehistory to 2010. The second section includes topics and, key buildings such as the Royal Pavilion. The purchase of this building as a tourist attraction and central site for meetings was innovatory. This is the only royal home in England owned by a local authority.In the second section major topics will be covered such as the development of local government, education and, religions and places of worship. The parish of Brighton was one of the outliers of Anglo-Catholicism, doughtily defended by Arthur Douglas Wagner but also has some striking places of worship belonging to other faiths. The later Victorian synagogue is regarded as one of the best in Europe.

 

Other articles on the topic of Brighton and Hove by Sue Berry can be found in the following journals:

  • Berry, S., ‘The development of the detached south facing villa along the south coast c.1740-1800’, Journal of the Georgian Group, XVI, 2008, 31-42.
  • Berry, S., ‘Thomas Read Kemp and the shaping of Regency Brighton’  Journal of the Georgian Group, XVII, 2009, 125-140.
  • Berry, S., ‘The Building of St Peters Church, Brighton’ Su