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This brass crown dating from the early 1700's, was probably used as a ceremonial piece for trades processions in Bristol.

This scroll now in the Bristol and West Progressive synagogue has a remarkable provenance.

Madron well chapel named after the saint of the nearby parish church, it was visited in the 16th and 17th centuries by people in search of healing.

Dupath Well, situated 1.5 kilometres east-south-east of Callington, is housed in a granite ashlar building and incorporates architectural features

Joanna Mattingly was pleased to find this resource.  The piece of the Mayoress's girdle was apparently kept as proof of Mousehole’s former status. 

Tithe maps were drawn up when tithe payments (a clergy-support tax of a tenth of all parish produce including fish) were commuted or changed to equal

During the intensive research into Newlyn and Mousehole Dr Joanna Mattingly made many friends.  On one of her visits to gather yet more information

One of the last acts of the Paul Urban District Council was to put up street nameplates in Newlyn (though not Mousehole) as a belated response to r

In the area later occupied by Paul and its neighbouring parishes, prehistoric settlement was concentrated in the upland areas away from the coast.

The Mompesson tomb in the south chapel of Codford St Mary's Church, moved there in the 19th century.

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